Archive for the ‘Ballroom Dancing’ Category

Dresses for Ballroom Dancing

Getting dressed for an evening on the ballroom dance floor is much different than getting ready for a night out at the club. With ballroom dancing becoming a popular American pastime, the attire is also constantly growing and changing. We’ve seen several styles of ballroom dancing dresses on television, thanks to the media’s recent interest in covering this elite activity. However, there are several differences in ballroom dress styles depending on the country.

American ballroom dresses are typically easy to distinguish from other nationalities. A primary trait of American dresses is that they “flow” much easier than those from other countries. For example, an American ballroom dress usually has at least two layers of skirt, along with other cuts of fabric flowing from the neck and back. In contrast, international dresses are known for heavier fabrics and feathers. Several American styles also are adorned with feathers, but are not the essential accent of the ballroom dress. Most international ballroom gowns are designed for appearance from one angle – either they look appealing from the front or back, but not usually both.

You’re most likely to find that American ballroom dresses are accented with sequins or jewels, and come in a variety of lengths. Most ballroom dresses do not extend all the way to the floor – this is probably because a long dress could become tangled in the dancer’s feet and lead to a disaster on the dance floor. However, the style of ballroom dress greatly depends on the type of dance being performed. For example, the paso doble is a popular style of ballroom dance that incorporates Spanish culture in the steps. It only makes sense that the dress would represent the theme; this particular dress would probably have sleeves, a ruffled knee-length skirt that twirls easily, and be decorated with lace.

If you find yourself confused by what you’ve read to this point, don’t despair. Everything should be crystal clear by the time you finish.

For more contemporary ballroom dances, the dress is usually very lightweight and moves well with the dancer. A popular look for the top of the dress is either halter-style or sleeves that dangle from the shoulder. Strapless-style dresses are not very common in ballroom dancing, probably because of the risk of falling off during a fast-paced dance or not fitting properly while moving about on the dance floor.

Most ballroom dresses come in a variety of colors and there are usually no limitations in this aspect. It is common American protocol for women to match their partner when it comes to choosing the color of their ballroom dress. However, the color can be anything the couple chooses, but it should be kept in mind that the shoes will need to match the dress exactly.

There are many options for finding a ballroom dress to match your needs. Most women choose to have their dress tailor made, especially if it is for a competition. This can get pricey, so there are a few other options. The internet is a great tool for finding everything you need in a ballroom dress. Although you can’t physically try it on, most online retailers will allow you to send them your exact measurements and have an excellent return policy.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his soon to be top ranked Perpetual20 training site: Perpetual 20

Ballroom Dancing – The Viennese Waltz and the Quick Step

If you have even a passing interest in the topic of Ballroom Dancing, then you should take a look at the following information. This enlightening article presents some of the latest news on the subject of Ballroom Dancing.

The Viennese Waltz which was derived from the Austrian Landler is an elegant fast paced, whirling dance where the partners hold each other as if in a romantic embrace. This raised more than a few eyebrows of “polite” society. The rise in popularity of the Viennese Waltz, like the standard waltz, can at least in part be contributed to the music of Johann Strauss and toVienna’s famous ballrooms. As with the standard waltz the music can be either vocal or instrumental and can be classical, country, or even rock.

The Viennese Waltz is a faster paced dance than the standard waltz which also makes it somewhat more challenging to do. Like the standard waltz the Viennese Waltz incorporates a simple, elegant rotation and swinging movements, though there should be no foot rise on the inner turns. The Viennese Waltz also requires a good deal of stamina, the equivalent, actually of the amount of energy that would be needed to dance a polka.

The Viennese Waltz uses a right turn (natural turn), a left turn (reverse turn) and two change steps that link the moves between the turns. Dancing the line of dance (direction of traffic – turning left at the corners of the dance floor) and rotating in a clockwise direction is the Natural Turn. Following the line of dance and rotating in a counter-clockwise direction is the Reverse Turn. The step links (change steps) allow you to change directions while still following the line of dance.

Most of this information comes straight from the Ballroom Dancing pros. Careful reading to the end virtually guarantees that you’ll know what they know.

The step links are simply two normal steps down the line of dance followed by a third step sliding the moving foot to the standing foot. By performing a string of change figures you can work your way through the tight spots on a crowded dance floor then resume the rotation. The “sway” is simply leaning slightly in the opposite direction of the line of dance movement
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Ballroom Dancing – The Quick Step

The Quick Step: The Charleston, the Black Bottom, the Shimmy and probably a couple other dances all melded into a faster version of the Fox Trot, which in 1923 became known as the Quick Step. The evolution of the Quick Step ended with a dance that utilizes a lot of movement, hops, runs, Quick Steps and rotation. It is a very brisk, energetic dance that was developed with very fast paced jazz music from the ragtime era.

The Quick Step is a fast, happy, lighthearted dance, the footwork can be a little complex using a slow, quick, quick, slow, quick, quick tempo. Like other dances the slow steps on the heel, Quick Steps on the toes.

The Quick Step utilizes a fast paced up and down swing motion. It’s important to look light on your feet even though the movements are powerful. Due to the quickness of the dance keeping in sync with your partner and trying to keep similar tension in the legs is a necessity. More so than the other dances facial expression is vital to express the fun aspect of the dance.

If you’ve picked some pointers about Ballroom Dancing that you can put into action, then by all means, do so. You won’t really be able to gain any benefits from your new knowledge if you don’t use it.

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Ballroom Dancing – The Jive

Are you looking for some inside information on Ballroom Dancing? Here’s an up-to-date report from Ballroom Dancing experts who should know.

The fastest of all the Latin dances would be the Jive. According to some sources the roots of this dance are in New York’s Harlem area, others put the origin of the dance with the Negroes of the southeast United States where it resembled the dances of the Seminole Indians. Depending on which source you are looking at either the Negroes copied it from the Indians or the Indians copied it from the Negroes.

The Jive is a face paced, rhythmical dance that was influenced by a number of other dance styles including Boogie, Rock, African American Swing and the Lindyhop. In the late 1800′s the Negroes in the south held Jive competitions where the prize was a cake which is how the dance became known for a while as the Cake Walk.

Unlike the other ballroom dances the Jive doesn’t require moving around the dance floor, however, even though it looks like the dancers feet are flying every which way the feet should be directly under the body with the knees always close together. You’ll see the woman being twirled a lot and lots of kicks. The music that is associated with the Jive is commonly called Ragtime, possibly because the participants dressed up in their finest clothes (“rags”) or maybe because of the syncopation of the music giving it a ragged feel.

Ballroom Dancing – The Samba

If your Ballroom Dancing facts are out-of-date, how will that affect your actions and decisions? Make certain you don’t let important Ballroom Dancing information slip by you.

When the Samba music plays its party time! The Samba originated with Brazil’s Rio Carnival and is comprised of several different South American dances. While walking and side steps are the main moves with heavy hitting rhythm and lots of hip action the Samba is the perfect party dance.

Slaves imported into Portugal in the 16th century brought along their dances (a few of which are the Catarete, Embolada and the Batuque). Europeans thought these dances were quite sinful as the dancers were close enough to have their navels touching. The Batuque was an incredibly popular dance – so much so that at one time it was outlawed. The Batuque was done in a circle with dance steps resembling those of a Charleston with a solo dancer in the center of the circle. Down the line carnival steps were added and members of Rio’s high society decided that once the dance had been modified to use the closed ballroom position it was then a proper dance.

Eventually aspects from all these dances and probably others combined emerging as the Samba we know today.

Some things the judges watch for in a good Samba are steps like the Volta (crossing in front of the body), the Samba Roll (moving the upper body in a circular motion while going through a six step turn), Botafogo (traveling walk that includes a direction change) and dancers who have a good balance of moving and stationary moves. They will also look for outstretched arms and the distinctive climax of the Samba where the dancers throw their heads back and their arms are splayed out to the side.

Now you can be a confident expert on Ballroom Dancing. OK, maybe not an expert. But you should have something to bring to the table next time you join a discussion on Ballroom Dancing.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his Perpetual20 training site for great bonuses: Perpetual20

Get in Shape with Ballroom Dancing

When you’re learning about something new, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of relevant information available. This informative article should help you focus on the central points.

Nearly everyone got caught up in the dance craze by watching “Dancing with the Stars” this past season. There’s just something about the music, the dances, the level of competition, and the sarcastic responses from the judges. But there is also something else to be noticed with the professional dancers – their bodies. Not one single professional dancer had an ounce of fat anywhere on their body. What you saw was lean, toned, and muscular abs, arms, and legs. You probably would never think that ballroom dancing can produce such a workout, but it’s actually one of the best physical fitness programs available.

Ballroom dancing is much more than a slow dance around a moonlit dance floor. There are several types of dances involved with ballroom dancing, ones that involve twirls, kicks, twists, and bends. In fact, ballroom dancing gives you the opportunity to move your body in a way that you would otherwise never experience – not even in an aerobics class.

It’s no secret that most people looking to get fit or lose weight are intimidated by the gym. Not only are you surrounded by people with a better body than you, but often you find yourself having to wait for a machine or struggling to keep up in a class. Ballroom dancing is a great way of making exercise fun, and it’s an activity you can do together with your partner or spouse. Unfortunately, some people continue to live inactive lifestyles because they just can’t find a physical activity they like to do.

Those of you not familiar with the latest on Ballroom Dancing now have at least a basic understanding. But there’s more to come.

You may be surprised to learn that ballroom dancing can burn just as much fat and calories (if not more) than a session at the gym. Depending upon the style of dance, you can easily burn between 200 and 400 calories. For example, the foxtrot or the waltz provide an easy and gentle workout and will burn around 200 calories. This is comparable to a brisk walk in the park or thirty minutes on the elliptical. On the other hand, dances like the jive or paso doble can burn over 400 calories, which is comparable to an intense step aerobics class.

While walking on a treadmill or doing crunches are well-known exercises, they only work certain parts of your body – which leave you to workout longer in order to cover the rest. Ballroom dancing literally works every part of your body and every major muscle group. You are more likely to see results faster due to the challenge your body endures with dancing.

And if you don’t have a partner to take with you to dance class, don’t let that stop you from experiencing the glide around the dance floor. Many classes will pair you up once you arrive, and you may meet some great friends or something more! Most people who get into ballroom dancing have lots of fun, and are more likely to dance longer which extends the duration of their workout. So trade in your walking shoes for some dance shoes, and dance your way into better shape!

About the Author
By Caleb Lee, feel free to visit his top ranked site: losing stomach fat

Modern Ballroom Dancing – Standard Waltz

When you’re learning about something new, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of relevant information available. This informative article should help you focus on the central points.

The standard Waltz is a graceful ballroom dance of turns and glides that was done in parts of Europe as early as the late 17th century and is thought by many to be the basis for many modern day dances. The early dances were done in the round and at the end of the dance the circle would break into couples who would then begin doing turns.

In Italy the dance was called the Volta, in France the Volte, Germans called it the Weller and in Austria the dance was known as the Landler. Although they probably all had some influence on the modern Waltz, at some point the Landler’s hopping movement became more of a gliding motion, which is why the Landler more than the others, is sometimes considered the forerunner of the modern Waltz. In the early 19th century the popularity of the Waltzen rose to such a great degree that several large dance halls were opened to accommodate the crowds. The dance stabilized during the 19th century its popularity was helped along by the music of Josef and Johann Strauss.

You can find references to the Waltz that go back more than 400 years, however the popularity of the dance had started to wane until 1913 and the advent of the Hesitation Waltz which, as the name implies, slowed the dance down considerably incorporating hesitations and poses throughout the dance. Before the Hesitation, dancing the Waltz was pretty much an endurance test with the couples dancing in one direction then reversing direction when they became dizzy.

If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole Ballroom Dancing story from informed sources.

The Waltz is an easy dance to master and has a grace and elegance that makes it wonderful to watch. The one thing that does cause beginners some confusion is that with a 3 count each bar is started with the opposite foot as the last bar. The slower version of the dance is known as the English Waltz while the faster version is the Viennese Waltz. .

Waltz music is played in 3/4 time with a distinctive 1-2-3 rhythm. The dance is a simple one with just 3 steps, first step forward (backward for the woman), one step to the side and the last step to bring the feet together again. The first step is the power step, matching the accented first beat of the music. A good Waltz has a smooth rise and fall; it’s a gentle dance with turns, poses and long sweeping movements. Waltz music can be found in many venues, some examples are: The Blue Danube by Johann Strauss Jr, Show Me the Way by Styx, Waltz to the Death from the Batman soundtrack by Danny Elfman. Either Waltz can be danced to any music with a three-quarter tempo regardless of whether it is classical, rock, country or anything else.

In competition ballroom Waltz there must be a clear pendulum movement, the right balance between up and down and spatial movements. The moment when you start your up and down movement from your supporting foot is crucial to keeping the movements smooth and graceful.

Some competitions use the American Smooth style of Waltz. This means that the couples are allowed to occasionally break the hold thereby enabling more open moves and underarm turns. To this day the Waltz is still popular world wide.

This article’s coverage of the information is as complete as it can be today. But you should always leave open the possibility that future research could uncover new facts.

About the Author
By Caleb Lee, feel free to visit his top ranked site: losing stomach fat

Ballroom Dancing – Slow Fox Trot

There are several different theories on the origin of this ballroom dance’s name. The most often told story is that the dance was made popular by a young man named Harry Fox who was a vaudeville comedian with the Ziegfeld Follies. Another story says that the dance is so named because of the similarity to an equestrian gait that was dubbed the Foxtrot by the military. It is a gait where unlike a normal trot where the front left and rear right (or front right and rear left) legs are moved at the same time causing a somewhat jerky motion, the Foxtrot has the animal moving each leg one at a time making for a smooth trot that is easier on the animal and the rider. This trot actually led to the development of a breed of horse known as the Missouri Fox Trotter. Still a third suggestion is that the dance (in its earlier version) resembled the way a fox walks (with one foot in front of the other leaving a single track).

In the early fox trot the feet were placed in a single line one in front of the other. It wasn’t until the 1950′s that this ballroom dance was revised to have two different dance lines, one for each foot. Around 1922 the jerking, trotting steps of the dance were exchanged for a more relaxed movement called a Saunter. By 1927 the jumpiness was gone and the steps were smooth and gliding and the dance was now referred to as a Slow Foxtrot.

This ballroom dance is composed of walking steps and side steps. When on a crowded dance floor like in a night club short steps are used. For ballroom dancing long, smooth, easy gliding steps combine to give the Fox Trot its unhurried appearance.

How can you put a limit on learning more? The next section may contain that one little bit of wisdom that changes everything.

The Fox Trot is danced with the same type of hold that is used in the standard waltz, with a combination of long slow steps and short lively ones. The timing of this ballroom dance is of great importance. The slower steps are done on the heels while the quick steps are done on the toes.

The Fox Trot can be danced to most any music regardless of whether it is slow or fast. In the 1920′s the Fox Trot was embraced by America’s youth. They loved this ballroom dance, which started out as a bouncy trot-like step that had been incorporated into the vaudeville act of Harry Fox. The Fox Trot has become one of the most loved ballroom dances to date. It is also one of the hardest to learn.

There is also what is referred to as an American Smooth style of Fox Trot that differs in as much as the hold can be broken throughout the performance so you will see more open movements and underarm turns.

Ballroom dancing has undergone many changes and one of the most significant developments was the use of the quick and slow steps of the Fox Trot allowing the dancers more variety than the earlier one and two step dances.

There’s a lot to understand about Ballroom Dancing. We were able to provide you with some of the facts above, but there is still plenty more to write about in subsequent articles.

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Modern Ballroom Dancing – Standard Waltz

When you think about Ballroom Dancing, what do you think of first? Which aspects of Ballroom Dancing are important, which are essential, and which ones can you take or leave? You be the judge.

The standard Waltz is a graceful ballroom dance of turns and glides that was done in parts of Europe as early as the late 17th century and is thought by many to be the basis for many modern day dances. The early dances were done in the round and at the end of the dance the circle would break into couples who would then begin doing turns.

In Italy the dance was called the Volta, in France the Volte, Germans called it the Weller and in Austria the dance was known as the Landler. Although they probably all had some influence on the modern Waltz, at some point the Landler’s hopping movement became more of a gliding motion, which is why the Landler more than the others, is sometimes considered the forerunner of the modern Waltz. In the early 19th century the popularity of the Waltzen rose to such a great degree that several large dance halls were opened to accommodate the crowds. The dance stabilized during the 19th century its popularity was helped along by the music of Josef and Johann Strauss.

You can find references to the Waltz that go back more than 400 years, however the popularity of the dance had started to wane until 1913 and the advent of the Hesitation Waltz which, as the name implies, slowed the dance down considerably incorporating hesitations and poses throughout the dance. Before the Hesitation, dancing the Waltz was pretty much an endurance test with the couples dancing in one direction then reversing direction when they became dizzy.

So far, we’ve uncovered some interesting facts about Ballroom Dancing. You may decide that the following information is even more interesting.

The Waltz is an easy dance to master and has a grace and elegance that makes it wonderful to watch. The one thing that does cause beginners some confusion is that with a 3 count each bar is started with the opposite foot as the last bar. The slower version of the dance is known as the English Waltz while the faster version is the Viennese Waltz. .

Waltz music is played in 3/4 time with a distinctive 1-2-3 rhythm. The dance is a simple one with just 3 steps, first step forward (backward for the woman), one step to the side and the last step to bring the feet together again. The first step is the power step, matching the accented first beat of the music. A good Waltz has a smooth rise and fall; it’s a gentle dance with turns, poses and long sweeping movements. Waltz music can be found in many venues, some examples are: The Blue Danube by Johann Strauss Jr, Show Me the Way by Styx, Waltz to the Death from the Batman soundtrack by Danny Elfman. Either Waltz can be danced to any music with a three-quarter tempo regardless of whether it is classical, rock, country or anything else.

In competition ballroom Waltz there must be a clear pendulum movement, the right balance between up and down and spatial movements. The moment when you start your up and down movement from your supporting foot is crucial to keeping the movements smooth and graceful.

Some competitions use the American Smooth style of Waltz. This means that the couples are allowed to occasionally break the hold thereby enabling more open moves and underarm turns. To this day the Waltz is still popular world wide.

About the Author
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United States Amateur Ballroom dancers Association, Inc.

Have you ever wondered what exactly is up with Ballroom Dancing? This informative report can give you an insight into everything you’ve ever wanted to know about Ballroom Dancing.

In 1965 Norman Martin, a leading social and competitive ballroom dance champion put together a group of dancers known as the United States Amateur Ballroom Dancers Association, Inc. or USABDA. Their purpose was to petition the Olympic committee to include ballroom dancing in the Olympic program. Unfortunately they were not able to accomplish that goal at that time. However, while working on their bid to get into the Olympics, the group was setting up their bylaws and came to the conclusion that there was a definite need for guidelines for the large number of Social Dancers and American Style dancers, as well as the International Style competitors.

While working to help the dancers compete nationally and internationally they also helped to set things in motion to insure the availability of floors, music and locations for a group that turned out to be the backbone of the USABDA, the Social Dancers.

The early years for the USABDA only saw a small number of members in New York state, a few in the Washington, DC area and a small number on the west coast. In 1978 USABDA started its mid-eastern chapter and the push was on to take their little group to a national level. The next few years saw chapters being formed in several other states.

Hopefully the information presented so far has been applicable. You might also want to consider the following:

Throughout the 80′s the USABDA recruitment efforts consisted of trying to get all amateur dance organizations to join them as a national organization with a regional chapter structure. In 1985 with their new bylaws in place the USABDA was given tax-exempt status by the IRS. With the unification process started the USABDA was officially recognized by what is now known as the International DanceSport Federation (IDSF). The USABDA now governs all forms of amateur ballroom dancing in the United States.

Over the last 12 years USABDA has promoted the growth of all forms of ballroom dance as well as coming up with a program to establish chapters in each state. They have enjoyed major growth in numbers of chapters, dancers, competitions, workshops and social dances each year. Each year the USABDA sends United States representatives to the World Games. The World Games provide a venue for Olympic recognized sports that have not yet been added to the Olympic program.

The USABDA’s quest to get their spot in the Olympics is still going strong. To date the ISDF has been granted full recognition by the International Olympic Committee as the worldwide governing body for DanceSport and the USABDA has been granted affiliate membership recognizing them as the national governing Body of DanceSport in the Untied States. The last remaining step is for DanceSport to be granted Program Status by the IOC at which time DanceSport would then be added to the Olympic program. With continued hard work and a little luck this will be accomplished in the near future.
The USABDA has grown into an organization with thousands of members who volunteer to help promote social and competitive dancing on college campuses and in communities across the country.

As your knowledge about Ballroom Dancing continues to grow, you will begin to see how Ballroom Dancing fits into the overall scheme of things. Knowing how something relates to the rest of the world is important too.

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Find Kansas City Tickets now for all Kansas City Concert tickets, theater tickets, and sports tickets. Use our seating maps to pinpoint where you will be. This will quickly help you decide which Kansas City tickets fit your budget and seating preference so that you can determine the best VALUE for your ticketing dollar.
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Ballroom Dancing – The Handicapped and the Disabled

Dancing is good for your overall health, for weight loss and for mental relaxation. Everyone loves to dance, including those people who just happen to be blind, deaf, missing limbs or confined to a wheelchair. Many groups have formed classes to teach these people ballroom, line dances, jazz ballet and anything else they may want to learn.

The Malta Wheelchair Dancesport Association is one of those groups. Wheelchair dancing had been practiced in parts of the world since the 1970′s but wasn’t started in Malta until 1999. The group holds classes to teach dance to disabled people using a format very similar to that used to teach non-disabled people. The classes are open to people who just want to learn to dance and those who want to dance competitively.

When it comes to the competitive dances there are two groups, Combi (one partner is in a wheelchair the other is not) or Duo (both parties are in wheelchairs). They learn all the Standard Ballroom dances and the Latin American Ballroom dances. For those who are just interested in social dancing they offer courses for line and solo dances.

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about Ballroom Dancing? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

Wheelchair dancers use their upper bodies and arms to perform the same movements in the same manner as non-disabled dancers. Also, no different from non-disabled dancers, some are good and some aren’t but ALL dance because they love it. The dance classes have the added benefit of teaching both the wheelchair users and their helpers more and better uses of their chairs encouraging them to become more independent

The Gallaudet Dance Company is comprised of about 15 students all of whom are deaf or hard of hearing. Gallaudet is the worlds only accredited Liberal Arts University for the hearing impaired. The dancers rely on many things using their vision and sign language to communicate.

For years hearing people have bought into the theory that the deaf “hear’ by feeling vibrations through the floor. Although that may work when standing still on a surface that will conduct the vibrations it wouldn’t do much good when you are moving, jumping, or standing on a concrete floor. The Gallaudet Dancers practice for hours on end to develop an inner sense of the timing for each dance. This is accomplished in part by watching an instructors counting out the rhythm of the dance. The instructor will give a sign for each step in much the same way hearing dancers will get a vocal count from their instructor.

Deaf and hearing-impaired dance students work had to remain “in time” with or without music. The most important things for teaching these students to dance are a visual count, high quality sound systems and use of sign language.
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Hundreds of viewers watched fascinated as Heather Mills competed for several weeks on Dancing with the Stars with one prosthetic leg. Not only was it difficult to tell which leg it was most of the time but she performed some high difficulty moves that the other dancers didn’t even attempt!

As your knowledge about Ballroom Dancing continues to grow, you will begin to see how Ballroom Dancing fits into the overall scheme of things. Knowing how something relates to the rest of the world is important too.

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Choosing a Ballroom Dance for your Wedding

If you have even a passing interest in the topic of Ballroom Dancing, then you should take a look at the following information. This enlightening article presents some of the latest news on the subject of Ballroom Dancing.

Weddings are a special time for everyone. It’s a time of new beginnings for the happy couple and friends and families become witnesses to the exceptional event. With so many details that go into planning a wedding, often choosing a dance for the reception isn’t a priority; rather, a lot of time goes into choosing which song the bride and groom will dance to.

Selecting a song to dance to is typically the first step in the couple deciding on a ballroom dance. Most couples will opt to enroll in professional ballroom dance lessons with a certified instructor to come up with a dance for their song. With ballroom dancing growing in popularity, couples are beginning to steer away from the traditional circular dance. In fact, more and more engaged couples are choosing to learn a ballroom dance for their wedding.

Not only is performing a ballroom dance for your wedding very sentimental, but it is also likely to be remembered by everyone. However, a ballroom dance doesn’t have to be strictly between the bride and groom. It can involve the bride and her father, the groom and his mother, or anyone else the happy couple chooses to share a dance with. With so many variations of ballroom dancing, it may be difficult to select a specific dance. Below are some popular song suggestions for weddings and ballroom dances that would be appropriate with them.

Truthfully, the only difference between you and Ballroom Dancing experts is time. If you’ll invest a little more time in reading, you’ll be that much nearer to expert status when it comes to Ballroom Dancing.

Two very well-known wedding songs are “Love Me Tender” and “I Can’t Help Falling in Love with You,” both performed by Elvis Presley. These songs, while traditional at weddings, set the perfect tone for a slow waltz. The waltz is a careful collaboration of steps involving walking and side to side motions – these songs provide the exact tempo and beat for this style of ballroom dancing. Another major plus of performing the waltz is that it’s easy to learn and can be done by nearly anyone of any skill level.

“From This Moment On” is a song performed by legendary country music singer Shania Twain and is a popular choice among bride and groom dances. This song remains slow and romantic, but the beat is slightly faster compared to the Elvis Presley songs. “From This Moment On” is an excellent choice for dancing the foxtrot, a slow yet very smooth dance that follows forward and backward patterns around the dance floor. Like the waltz, it is fairly easy to learn.

A few popular choices for dancing with the parents of the couple are “Through the Years” by Kenny Rogers and “Wind beneath My Wings” by Bette Midler. The waltz would also be appropriate for these songs as well as the tango, although this ballroom dance may take a little longer to learn due to its sharp and precise steps.

By choosing to perform a ballroom dance at your wedding (as opposed to just moving about in a circle or from side to side), you are sure to create lifelong memories for yourself and your guests.

About the Author
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